False analogy examples in advertising

A lot of the articles I read online about advertising often use examples of poor advertising. I can’t be the only one who notices this.

The irony of advertising is that many times, the best examples are the ones that can’t be applied to the real world.

So, in this article, I’m going to share a few of the best examples I’ve seen, and I hope you’ll get a few ideas for your own advertising.

1. The ‘Easter egg’ is too small

I saw this ad on a website I was reading when I was in grade school. It was for a brand of chocolate (I don’t remember which one, but I’ve seen it everywhere) that advertised that they had something hidden in their chocolate.

When I first saw it, I thought it was a joke.

“Easter egg”, “hidden” what are the chances I can find this hidden chocolate? How can I get it?

Then, I saw the ad and my jaw dropped. The item they were talking about was nothing compared to their claims. I was stunned and I’ve been a fan ever since.

There’s nothing to hide the item is very small, and no one will ever find it. It’s a great example of an ad that’s too good to be true.

2. You’re only getting 10% of the true story

This ad from one of the big companies in the US is a great example. The brand was trying to sell me the benefits of their car insurance. But, in reality, they were telling me a story that was wrong.

The story was that their car insurance was free, but they had to pay $30 a month in hidden fees.

This is not true. I’ve seen the same car insurance in the market, and it costs roughly $100 a month.

The truth is that all the extra fees were added to their bill, and they were charged only 10% of the true price.

The ad is great because it’s not focused on the ad’s message, but on the flaws of the campaign.

This ad is an example of what makes great advertising the truth.

3. The product is expensive, but it’s not the best value

This is a great example of a product that is hard to get into.

The company was selling an electric skateboard that is extremely difficult to pedal and control. The problem is that it doesn’t have good acceleration.

So, there are people out there who are willing to pay for a board that has good acceleration but it’s too expensive.

This ad is great because it shows that not everyone has the same level of skill, so the product isn’t necessarily best in class. It’s easy to find a board like this, but it doesn’t have the highest value.

The goal is not to sell the product, but to show that the product is hard to use and expensive.

4. An ad that takes advantage of a negative

This ad is an example of a negative ad campaign. The ad shows a man doing some backflips in the shower. Then, he shows a woman (who is not in the shower) dancing in the shower.

The point is that the man is using the woman’s bathroom when the woman is in the shower and this is seen as inappropriate. The ad features the man’s reaction to the woman’s behavior.

This ad is great because it takes advantage of a negative, it’s funny, and it has a message. It’s a great ad that shows how important it is to keep your actions in perspective.

5. The ad shows a problem, but it doesn’t solve it

This ad from Dyson features a video of a dog struggling to catch a ball. The dog is trying to catch the ball.

Then the ad shows a man (who isn’t with the dog) holding the ball, and the dog keeps reaching for it. This is a great example of when an ad looks great, but doesn’t solve a problem.

The ad is great because it shows something negative, but not something that needs to be solved.

6. The ad features a problem, but it doesn’t solve the problem

This ad from Samsung features a dog running through a snow and ice storm. The dog is being chased by a man on a snowmobile.

The point is that the dog is running through the snow storm, and the man on the snowmobile is trying to catch the dog.

This ad shows that it’s not always a good idea to use an ad to solve a problem.

7. The ad highlights a problem, but doesn’t solve it

This ad from Dollar Shave Club (DSC) features a dog scratching its ear with its tongue. It’s doing this because it’s missing a hair on its head.

The point is that the dog is missing a hair and it’s trying to find it by scratching its ear. So, the owner of the dog is on his cell phone trying to find the hair.

It’s a great example because the ad shows a problem, but not a problem that needs to be solved.

8. The ad highlights a problem, but it doesn’t solve the problem

This ad features a man in a bathtub. He’s scratching his arm.

The point is the man is in a bathtub, and he’s scratching his arm. So, he’s trying to scratch his arm.

This ad shows that not all problems need to be solved.

9. The ad highlights a problem, and it doesn’t solve it

This ad features a man on a snowboard and another man in a boat. The man on the snowboard is trying to catch the other man on the boat.

Last point

The best ads are the ones that highlight what you’re seeing.

The best ads are the ones that show the truth in a positive light.

If you’re looking for a new car, the ad that shows a family looking for a new car is a great ad.

The ad doesn’t sell a new car, but it does show the truth about the car market.

If you’re looking for a new phone, the ad that shows a young man looking for a new phone is a great ad. The ad doesn’t sell a phone, it’s just showing a good example of what it’s like to be young.

If you’re looking for a new job, the ad that shows a young woman looking for a new job is a great ad.

Images by Freepik

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